Sunday, 1 January 2012

My first day in 2012

I wanted New Year's day to be one we would enjoy immensely, while setting the scene for a year ahead. We drove from Wanaka to Queenstown in Central Otago, New Zealand, then met our friends Kim and Glennys Logan, and son Inia, just north of Queenstown. Our desitination Pigeon Island at the northern end of Lake Wakatipu. What I really wanted to do was introduce my boys to lake fishing, climb a small mountain, and let my family who hardly know New Zealand, experience life on a small remote island in view of our mighty southern Alps. Kim Logan, a close friend and one of New Zealand's leading mountain guides, mountaineers, fisherman and hunter, was a great companion for the day. Being Maori, he has a knack of explaining the flora, fauna and rich history. in such a fascinating manner, as they are a people of oral tradition.
We went to Pigeon Island (centre left) by boat from the Queenstown-Glenorchy road, climbed to the highest point, fished in the lake, played cricket, had a wonderful BBQ with excellent Wanaka white wine, and Kim explained the history and environment. Photo: Bob McKerrow 


Ablai, Inia and Mahdi on Kim's boat


Kim and Glnnys Logan at the highest point on Pigeon Island with the east and west peaks of Mt. Earnlaw on the upper right, peaks which Kim has climbed at least 40 times. He climbed Aoraki Mount Cook about 30 times by 13 different routes as well as climbing in the Himalaya and Karakoram,

One of the 'hard men' of the NZ mountains Kim is a legend with his solo ascents, first ascents and extensive climbs throughout NZ. Kim rarely records what he does carrying on the oral tradition of capturing Maori history.

When we were on the summit of the high point on Pigeon Island, Kim and I were looking at the mountains we had climbed at the heads of the Rees, Dart, Beansburn, Rockburn, Routeburn and Greenstoen valleys, peaks all named by my Grandfather, James McKerrow surveyor and explorer. The second mountain I ever climbed was Mt. Poseidon in the Park Pass area at the head of the Rock Burn, and Kim pointed it out with his ever-sharp eye. It is the second peak on the left skyline. I climbed it in February 1967 along with some other unnamed and unclimbed peaks adjacent to it.

When the four of us came down from the mountain, the boys had fashioned out a cricket pitch and were in the middle of a match, Ablai bowling, Inia batting, and Mahdi in at wicket keeper. With Ablai and I having met Muttiah Muralitharan and Brendan and Nathan McCallum the day before at a cricket match in Queenstown, Ablai  was greatly inspired. Photo: Bob McKerrow


Kim whose knowledge of flora and fauna is marvellous, took time out to show us the flowering southern beach and the Koromiko pictured above. Photo: Bob McKerrow


Our son Mahdi went fishing for the first time and was a highlight of his life for him. Photo: Bob McKerrow

Relics of early Maori and European settlers were to be seen on various parts of the island. Here is an old gold miner's hut and used later by shepherds. Photo: Bob McKerrow

As we boated across the lake to our vehicles, Mount Earnslaw said 'goodbye' by giving us a perfectly clear view of its snow covered ramparts. What a day to start 2012 and for me it gave me a glimpse of my priorities for 2012: family, exercise, friends, being adventurous and risk taking, and a balanced life like this will  make me more committed and productive in my work for the Red Cross. Photo: Bob McKerrow

1 comment:

Marja said...

What a great experience on such a beautiful place. Wish you lots of peace happiness and joy in 2012